Achacha

General Description/History

Achacha is the name given to the Achachairú which is a highly prized fruit cultivated in small orchards in the Bolivian part of the Amazon Basin in South America, and now grown in Australia. Achachairú means “honey kiss” in an indigenous Guaraní language.

The Achacha is from the same family and is similar in taste to the mangosteen (garcinia magostana). It is egg-shaped, up to 6cm long by 4cm in diameter. It takes on a reddish-orange shade when mature. There is usually one significant coffee-coloured seed, but larger fruit may have more than one seed. It may have small bumps and marks on its skin but this does not affect its quality.

The fruit has a wonderful balance between sweet and tart, with a delicate sorbet finish.

To open pinch with your thumbnail or knife around skin, then squeeze and pop open the fruit. The seed is not normally eaten, but it, and the skin, can be made into a refreshing drink.

Nutritional Value

Achachas are a rich source of essential nutrients like potassium and vitamin C, but they’re also one of the highest fruit sources of folate. Achachas are also lighter in sugar than many other fruits while still having a subtle sweet taste.

Storage/Handling

Achacha fruit does not ripen further once harvested (i.e. once picked from the tree). They will keep for weeks without refrigeration, especially when stored at their ideal temperature of between 13-15ºC. For best results, avoid refrigeration for extended periods of time and store in the coolest part of your house.

They can also be frozen in their skins for a long period. Take Achacha from freezer, run under cold tap, run knife around skin both ways. After removal of skin, remove the white fleshy part. It is easy to remove pulp from frozen fruit. This pulp can then be used for sorbet and ice-cream. For salads use only fresh fruit.

Season: Summer

Botanical Name: garcinia humilis selecto

Alternative Names: Achachairu

Availablity: January,February,December

Growing Areas: QLD – Burdekin